Physical therapy is a valuable tool to doctors and orthopedists who are helping their patients rehabilitate injuries or recover from major surgery. It is a non-invasive method that can be used as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with other treatments. Physical therapy is a term used to describe a collection of therapeutic methods, such as exercise therapy, massage therapy, hot and cold therapy and electrical stimulation therapy. It is designed to challenge the body’s musculoskeletal system, pushing it beyond the boundaries caused by disease, deformity or injury.

Did you know…

that physical therapy is thousands of years old? Although there is no way of knowing exactly when it was first used, scientists do know that both Hippocrates and Hector advocated for its use as early as 460 B.C. But it wasn’t until the late 1800s and early 1900s that formal schools of physiotherapy began to emerge, along with professional societies of physical therapists. By the 1950s, physical therapy began to spread outside of hospital settings and into outpatient centers and doctor’s offices where it continues today.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I need physical therapy?

There are many people who could benefit from physical therapy. Examples include athletes with overuse injuries, patients with arthritis, joint replacement surgery patients, and anyone who is limited by chronic musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, or motion range restrictions. Patients may also benefit from physical therapy if they are suffering from traumas to the body’s connective tissues, such as torn ligaments or tendinitis. To find out if physical therapy is right for you, contact your orthopedist to schedule a consultation.

What should I expect during a physical therapy session?

Your orthopedist will prescribe physical therapy that will challenge you without over-working you. The long-term goal for many orthopedic patients is improved joint mobilization and less pain. You can expect your physical therapy sessions to gradually increase in difficulty, constantly challenging you to make progress toward your goals. Some patients require physical therapy for just a few weeks, whereas others need it for several years. Your exact experience will vary according to your needs.

Is there anything I can do to help improve the outcome of my treatment?

It is not unusual for orthopedists to prescribe in-office physical therapy accompanied by at-home stretches or exercises. Depending on your specific circumstances, you may be advised to adopt a more active lifestyle or perhaps avoid certain physical activity until you make a full recovery. The most important thing you can do to facilitate a better treatment outcome is to follow your orthopedist’s instructions exactly as advised.

Orthopedics is a specialty branch of medicine pertaining to conditions and diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Everyone is born with many muscles, bones and connective tissues that work together to form the support structure of the body. Orthopedists work to ensure these components remain strong and healthy, and the patients are free of pain and discomfort. The overall goal of orthopedics is to extend highly effective care and results using the conservative and minimally invasive treatments available.

Did you know?

An orthopedist treats patients of all ages, from birth to old age. Children are often born with physical deformities that require ongoing orthopedic care. Some people visit orthopedists after suffering a traumatic injury – perhaps in a car accident or while playing sports. Still, some patients do not require orthopedic care until much later in life, when arthritis often appears. Regardless of the reason for seeing an orthopedist or age, there are treatments available that can restore or repair the full function of the musculoskeletal system in many patients.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if I need to see an orthopedist?

You may need to visit an orthopedist if you are suffering from any type of musculoskeletal disease or injury. Examples include osteoarthritis, torn ligaments, scoliosis, deformities, bone fractures, herniated discs, and compressed vertebrae. If you have not been diagnosed with any of these conditions but are suffering from joint pain, back pain, stiffness, limited mobility, or other musculoskeletal symptoms, schedule a consultation with an orthopedist to find out more about the cause of your discomfort.

What types of treatments are available from an orthopedist? Do all patients require orthopedic surgery?

It is true that orthopedics often perform surgery to restore a joint, repair severe fractures, or replace a damaged disc. But that doesn’t mean that all patients require surgical intervention. In fact, many patients are able to achieve less pain and fewer symptoms using far less invasive treatments, such as physical therapy, prescription medications, and joint injections. Talk with your orthopedist to find out which treatments could be right for you.

How long will it take for me to recover from an orthopedic surgery?

If you require orthopedic surgery, the thought of undergoing an operation may be intimidating. However, you can trust that many common orthopedic operations – such as knee and hip replacement – boast some of the highest success rates in modern medicine. Furthermore, today’s minimally invasive methods often mean a shorter recovery time overall. Speak with your orthopedic surgeon about any questions you have regarding the recovery period after your operation.

Sports and athletics play an important role in the lives of many people here. Not only are sports a fun pastime, but the regular activity keeps bodies healthy and strong. Unfortunately, there are risks associated with nearly every athletic activity, from running and swimming to swinging a golf club or tennis racket. The goal of our sports orthopedics services is to help our patients recover from sports-related injuries and enjoy safe sports participation in the future. By identifying and treating injuries as quickly as possible, we can make medical interventions and develop a rehabilitative plan for recovery.

Did you know…

that sports orthopedists are capable of treating a wide range of athletic injuries?

Examples include:

Frequently Asked Questions

Could I benefit from a sports orthopedics consultation?

Many athletes take advantage of sports orthopedics to treat injuries and traumas caused by physical activity. If you participate in sports, go to the gym, or enjoy any type of athletic activity, sports orthopedics may help alleviate the symptoms caused by repetitive motion, overuse, or some other type of trauma.

What should I expect during my first visit?

Your initial visit will provide your doctor with an understanding of your physical and athletic history. During this visit, you will explain any pain, stiffness or swelling you may have been experiencing. Based on the results of your initial examination, your doctor may request further tests, such as x-rays or MRI imaging, to make a diagnosis and develop a personalized treatment plan.

What can I do to prevent my condition from worsening or returning?

There are many things you can do to prevent an injury from worsening. Your doctor will make recommendations for any lifestyle changes that may benefit your orthopedic health. Often, a regimen of exercise and stretching can help prevent soft tissue damage, and working with a trainer can prevent overuse injuries. In some cases, patients may need to avoid some activities altogether to protect previously injured joints, bones, and tissues.

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